Privacy Policy

It’s always important to know what personal details are stored for use on any site and this site is no different. Read about my privacy policy.

I believe the sites and services we use online should be open about what information is collected and how it is used. In spite of some nonsense having been written about privacy threats, collecting information like this is not as creepy as it sounds because some information is needed just to make the internet work. For example, this page mentions your IP address. That’s the way the internet gets pages, music and video to your computer, phone or TV (depending on what you’ve connected). Without that address the internet won’t work so it has to be passed around a little bit.

The internet is also global which means it might not always be obvious where this information is going. For example, although I was born and live in the UK, the machines that hold this site are physically in the United States. I also use some services from Google which is headquartered there. So, some information passes through them.

So, in the spirit of letting you know what this site does – and doesn’t – do this page aims to explain it all as clearly as possible. If it’s not clear then I want to know.  Tell me @curns.

Respecting Your Privacy

The curnow.org website does not need to collect nor store your personal data in any way. You can use this site without sharing any personal information.

In common with most sites, the web server – which is the machine that sends the pages to you –  may collect information from your browser, including your IP address and the page you request which will be logged and used to identify the most popular pages. In addition to information stored by the web-servers of my hosting provider, Dreamhost, I use Google Analytics to help me understand how visitors use my site. It is anonymous and I do not know who you are. I also use the Cloudflare service to get the fastest page load times and best performance for the site. As the request for the page is routed through their service they may collect your IP information to be able to provide the service but they don’t keep it for very long. They wrote a blog post explaining what data they collect.

Comments and Email Addresses

If you contact me with your email address it will not be sold or released to anybody else unless the law requires it.

You are able to comment on selected entries within the site or by using the form on the contact page. When you comment then the information you enter (name, email address and website URL) may be stored in cookies on your computer to allow you to easily to comment on other pages (see below).

Your email address is required if you wish to comment or contact me. This is to help authenticate real users and to deliver your message to me. It will never be shared with anybody else (I hate spam too) and you’re not going to get any emails from me except for any automated ones I set up to confirm your comment or contact (unless your contact request asks me to get in touch, of course). For security and to prevent spamming, the system collects your IP address from which you made the comment and this is recorded alongside the comment. That data is stored on my servers which, as I have mentioned, are located with Dreamhost in the US.

I use the Akismet anti-spam service for comments. The data on the comments  — IP address, user agent, name, email address, website, and message — is submitted to the Akismet service (owned by Automattic) for the sole purpose of spam checking. The actual submission data is stored in the database at curnow.org and is emailed to me. This email will include the submitter’s IP address, timestamp, name, email address, website, and message.

If you use the contact form then I will receive an email containing your message. My email provider is also located in the US. Therefore, if you are from within the EU, you should be aware that these basic details will be sent outside of the European Union but it’s really no different then sending a email to somebody which, I imagine, you do quite a lot anyway.

Please remember that any details you leave in the actual comment on a page will be displayed. Do not enter anything you do not want to be published on the site. Please think before posting any personal details. I will remove all posts containing obvious real world information and I reserve the right to remove any posts. If you use the contact form then your message will not be displayed on the site.

Moderation

Depending on the amount of comments – or spam –  I am getting, I sometimes – but not always – hold them until they have been reviewed. Don’t worry if I don’t publish your comment quickly as it can often take me some time to get round to it. You can always nudge me @curns.

Cookies

A ‘cookie’ is a small file that is placed in your browser and allows curnow.org to, amongst other things, recognise when you have commented or that you have seen the cookie notification on the top of the page. A number of cookies are set and by using this site you consent to the setting of these cookies.

Specifically, a cookie called catAccCookies is used to show you have seen and accepted the cookie message. Once this cookie is set you will not see the message again unless you delete it. A cookie called w3tc_referrer may be set. This helps with speeding up of the site (technically known as caching). It knows nothing about you and is used to help the site function well. The cookie __cfduid is related to the Cloudflare that also helps speed up the site and, they too, have a helpful cookie policy. You will see cookies with a name like  __utma (or similar). These are related to Google Analytics which I use to understand how people use my site. Google have a whole page devoted to explaining these cookies and a mechanism for you to opt-out if you wish. You will find more details at http://www.google.com/analytics/learn/privacy.html. Finally, I store some cookies if you comment on articles (they all have a cookie name that begins comment_) that allows the site to remember the details you have entered so that you may comment on multiple articles without having to keep retyping your details. All of these cookies will stay on your machine until their expiry dates but you may delete them all without causing any problems (they will get set again if you come back or comment again). They fall into the category of ‘very helpful cookies that save you typing’.

The sites does not use cookies for anything else. There are no tracking or advertising cookies set. For more information on cookies please see aboutcookies.org and remember that you may delete the curnow.org cookies at any time. It will not effect your interaction with any other site. If you do not accept cookies, you can still use the site. If you want to delete your cookies then aboutcookies.org has a handy guide.

Gravatar

I use the Gravatar image service when you comment on the site. curnow.org will contact Gravatar to see if you have a picture that you wish to set with your comments. If you have never set this then it won’t find one. It’s a fun thing to do but if you don’t use that service then it can’t magically put a picture of you there.

Other Services 

There are a few other services supporting this site. I use Google Fonts for some of the display fonts. No cookies are sent by website visitors to Google Fonts. Requests to the Google Fonts are made to resource-specific domains, such as fonts.googleapis.com or fonts.gstatic.com, so that your requests for fonts are separate from and do not contain any credentials you send to google.com while using other Google services that are authenticated, such as Gmail.

The technology behind this site is WordPress and I use some elements of their Jetpack service to provide this site.  These services are provided by a company called Automattic and information about the data they collect is here.

Do Not Track

Note that I won’t show the cookie warning if you have enabled do not track in your browser settings as the site honours that setting and doesn’t set most cookies (i.e. I won’t set comment cookies). Google Analytics, however, may still set their cookies. You will find more details at http://www.google.com/analytics/learn/privacy.html.

Credit Card Details

We do not need this information ever, so you do not need to enter it anywhere on this site.

External Sites

curnow.org is not responsible for the content of external internet sites. You are advised to read the privacy policy of external sites before disclosing any personal information.

Remember The Risks Whenever You Use The Internet

There is no reason to send us any personal details other than as specified above. In addition other Internet sites or services that may be accessible through curnow.org have separate data and privacy practices independent of my site, and therefore I want to let you know that I disclaim any responsibility or liability for their policies or actions.

Please contact those vendors or sites directly if you have any questions about their privacy policies.

Corrections and Contact

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if something on the site requires correction or removal. This policy was last revised in May 2015 to add the Cloudflare service and update the details about the cookie alert.

 

Key

Security on the Internet is a big concern for many people. Keeping information that identifies you personally from falling into the wrong hands is important. Check for secure sites when submitting credit card information, be careful about who you give your email to and read privacy policies. This is all worthy advice.

If you are concerned about sending information (or you want to verify information came from where it says it came from) I would recommend you investigate Pretty Good Privacy. A useful piece of freeware to digitally sign and/or encrypt files (including emails).

PGP uses a system known as public key encryption. As a PGP user you would generate a “key pair” which is made up of both a public and private key. The private key should only be accessible by its owner but in order to share files etc. you need to share your public key (and you would need a copy of another user’s to send files). For mote information see PGP or PGP International.

Occasionally, I use PGP to sign emails or encrypt files. If you wish to email me using PGP my public key is given here.

other resources

Visit PGP and read this message (at PGPI) from Phil Zimmermann who invented PGP.

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Version: PGPfreeware 7.0.3 for non-commercial use 

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My Web

Much of the information below is now well out of date and many of the site are no longer around. Independent Radio News’ site no longer has any of the original code behind it and Satellite Media Services went out of business a long time ago. See ex-sms.com a little bit more about that company. I’m leaving this page up, however, because it remains a valid history of some of the early websites I worked on.

Since I have been online I have been involved in the development of a number of web sites. Nowadays, I do not work for a web development company so many of the sites listed here are not the versions that I was involved in. Some of them have developed well and some seems somewhat stuck and, dare I say, even basic.

In 1994 I was working for Satellite Media Services. During the next two or three years we developed various versions of their web presence, including the online versions of IRN’s news service at The Radio Magazine. Now they have a new web address and much better design but don’t seem to develop sites for others any more.

The Radio Magazine has a new web site that has absolutely nothing to do with me but it still makes good reading about the UK radio industry.

Independent Radio News has also gone through several revamps. I can still see some of the code we developed behind this version of the site, and I suspect, the original audio scripts are still in place. IRON was one of the first sites in the UK to broadcast up-to-date news in RealAudio format.

At the time, Satellite Media Services was partially owned by Capital Radio plc and were responsible for the original prototype of Capital Online. Capital’s web services have moved on dramatically yet remain some of the best entertainment web sites around.

My original personal sites were based on the SMS servers and there remains no trace of them anymore. They were moved to various free space until I placed them here. The original UK Radio Information Pages were also based at SMS. They then moved to Onair before I removed them. James Cridland and the Media UK team do I much better job than I was doing.

SMS, back then, was a satellite audio distribution company. Back in 1994 I used to produce a site featuring a range of photographs of SMS’ satellite dishes which became a something of a cult site for a while (I know, the whole thing was very strange). Media UK also became the host of those pictures but, somewhat wisely, they seem to have removed them.

The next few web sites I was involved in are no longer in existence. Events Online, one of the UK’s first events listings services has long since vanished. It was an idea ahead of its time. For something similar, try Scene One (link now obsolete).

A number of other sites were developed around that time. Fruit Machine is still an idea and I did some of the scripting work behind the original Alternative Holidays site (working with Kevin from Incline Media – one of the best web productions houses around).

The last commercial web development I was involved in was at IPC Magazines (now IPC Media). Yachting and Boating World still has massive amounts of content behind it and, if you have an interest in sailing, why not pay it a visit?

I had great fun working on the development of all these sites. One day, I think I would like to work with content again (rather than software) but for now I am happy to be away from the struggles of generating commercial content.